• About
  • Tawhid
  • Islamic Ethics
  • Woman in Islam
  • Friday, February 18, 2011

    20 Mandatory Nature of God in Islam

    20 Mandatory Nature of God in Islam

    According to Islamic Teaching, God The Almighty has Mandatory nature which is different with human nature (مخلوق) which distinguishes between The Creator with Creations. There are 20 Mandatory Nature of God According to Islam. They are :
    • Wujud (الوجود) means "Exist" (Be in a place), the evidence that Allah exists can be seen through the presence of this world and all its contents. because it's impossible that there is the world (Creation) without the existence of God (Creator)
    • Qidam (القدم) means "The First without any preceding previous" because it's impossible that the creator is preceded by his creations.
    • Baqa (البقاء) means "Eternal" which will not be damaged forever. in accordance with God's word in The Holly Qur'an Surah Al-Qashash verse 88 : "Everything will surely perish, except Allah"
    • Mukhalafatu Lil Hawaditsi (المخالفة للحوادث) means "impossible to be equals with the creations (Makhluk)". because if He (God) equals with creation, it means that he was made, and it's impossible for God to be made by someone. In accordance with his word in the holly Qur'an, surah Asy-Syura, verse 11 : "There is nothing equals with him (Allah).
    • Qiyamuhu Bi Nafsihi (القيامه بنفسه) means "stand alone without requiring the help of others", because if he need the help of someone else, meaning that he is weak, and the "weak" is not the nature of God.
    • Wahdaniyaat (الوحدانية) means "single one", it's impossible for God to be Many, because if he is not one (Many), disputes will arise between (among) them (Gods), because of the differences of their willing.
    • Qudrat (القدرة) means "almighty" because if he is not almighty, meaning he is weak. and "weak" is not nature of God.
    • Iradat (الارادة) means "wills on his own (not forced)" because if he is forced, meaning that there is someone forces him. something forced is weak. and it's not the nature of God.
    • Ilmu (العلم) means "omniscient" because if he is not omniscient, meaning that he is fool. if he is so, meaning that he is weak. and it's not the nature of God.
    • Hayaat (الحياة) means "alive" it's impossible for God to be Dead.
    • Sama' (السمع) means "hear" it's impossible for God to be Deaf, because if so, meaning that God has disability and need something to help him hear. if so, it means that he is weak. and "weak" is not nature of God.
    • Bashar (البصر) means "see" because if he is blind, he needs something to help him to be able to see. meaning that he is weak. and it's impossible for God.
    • Kalaam (الكلام) "speak" because if he is mute, he can not command his servants well. and it's impossible for God.
    • Kaunuhu Qaadiran (كونه قادرا) means "his circumstance is almighty", the explanation is as same as God's nature number 7. it's impossible for God to be in weak circumstances.
    • Kaunuhu Muridan (كونه مريدا ) means "his circumstance is wills" it's impossible for God to be in Forced circumstances. the explanation is as same as God's nature number 8.
    • Kaunuhu 'Aliman (كونه عالما) means "his circumstance is knowing" it's impossible for God to be in Foolish circumstance.
    • Kaunuhu Hayyan ( كونه حيا) means "his circumstance is alive" it's impossible for God to be in dead circumstance.
    • Kaunuhu Sami'an ( كونه سميعا) means "his circumstance is Hearing" it's impossible for God to be in Deaf circumstances.
    • Kaunuhu Bashiran (كونه بصيرا) Means "his circumstance is Seeing" it's impossible for God to be in Blind circumstance.
    • Kaunuhu Mutakalliman ( كونه متكلما) means "his circumstance is Speaking" it's impossible for God to be in Mute circumstance.
    Those are 20 Mandatory Nature of Allah that must be known by every muslim, so that we can know better the nature of his and further increase our faith in Him.

    Thanks for reading this article, Please see our next post 20 Impossible Nature of God in Islam.

    You Might Also Like:

    Disqus Comments